Will your disaster recovery provider be in business when you need them?

Disaster Recovery plans that depend on outsourcers face significant additional risk

What if your were in Florida and the Hurricane season was in full swing and your provider decided to go out of business. Would you have the time to move to a new provider and test your solution before you need to execute your plan?

For example, earlier in the year Google decided to close its Message Continuity service. Google gave most clients a reasonable timescale to find an alternative supplier. This allowed existing Message Continuity contracts to run until their contacts expired. What if that was the communication solution you had selected for communicating with your staff? Would you be able to implement a new one on time.

Business Continuity - Disasters Happen

Another example was the news that Doyenz, the US-based supplier of rCloud, a service which offers disaster recovery for physical and virtual servers, had decided to pull the plug on its UK operations. Clients were given not weeks or months but days to respond and to find a new supplier.

CIOs and IT managers all need to consider all of the possibilities and have alternative solutions in place and tested.

Author: Victor Janulaitis

M. Victor Janulaitis is the CEO of Janco Associates. He has taught at the USC Graduate School of Business, a Graduate School at Harvard University, been a guest lecturer at the UCLA's Anderson School of Business and several other universities in various programs.Prior to Janco, he was a Vice President at Index Systems and found PSR, Inc. and internationally recognized consulting practice.