Tech Savy Young Hires Talent Shortage

Tech savy young hires talent Shortage is real for many enterprises

Shortage of Young IT Talent makes the promotion process falter

Tech savy young hires talent shortage is widely discussed among CIOs. The shrinking unemployment rate has drained the talent pool in many corporate IT functions and industries, and companies continually complain that they can’t find qualified staff. For Information Technology departments, the problem is different: If they were looking solely for the technical skills they wanted years ago, they would be overwhelmed with candidates. Today, though, such skills are table stakes, and the focus is on finding people who stand out because they have other desired qualities as well.

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Given companies’ increasing reliance on data in decision-making, demand is soaring for a demonstrated aptitude for analytics. Even more important for the long-term success of new hires, however, are assorted “soft” skills that allow them to communicate and collaborate with others, as well as influence others’ attitudes and behaviors.

According to some CIO, there is not a shortage of finance talent per se, but there is a shortage of people who have both technical expertise and these additional skills that will enable them to work well inside an organization.

Given this shortage, IT departments are aggressively positioning themselves as employers of choice. And they can’t allow themselves the luxury of easing up on that quest, since their competitors are doing the same thing.

What are CIOs and CFOs looking for

CIOs and CFOs are telling Janco Associates they want Information Technology students who know how important application strategy will be in any IT function and who show a willingness to embrace and explore analytical tools and methods. Students don’t necessarily need to know how to code.  Many companies that are successfully hiring young candidates with prowess in analytics are looking beyond traditional sources like business schools and accounting firms.

The problem is that demand for those candidates far outpaces supply. CIO should be looking for people who may not have the desired business background or professional experience but who possess the analytical skills IT pros need now and in the future.

Author: Victor Janulaitis

M. Victor Janulaitis is the CEO of Janco Associates. He has taught at the USC Graduate School of Business, been a guest lecturer at the UCLA's Anderson School of Business, a Graduate School at Harvard University, and several other universities in various programs.

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